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"Going to the woods is going home, for I suppose
we came from the woods originally."

- John Muir

Jacks 'R' Better Stealth Universal Quilt

Jack in the Stealth
Photo by JRB

Manufacturer: Jacks R Better, LLC
Product: Stealth Universal Quilt (2008)
MSRP: $209.95
Website: http://www.jacksrbetter.com/
Listed Specs: Measured Specs:
Size
78" x 48" (198 x 122 cm)
80" x 49" (203 x 124 cm)
Loft
1.5" (3.8 cm)
1.5-2" (3.8-5cm)
Weight
15 oz (425 g)
16.25 oz (462 g)
* The length and width are pulled tight so that shouldn't be considered a discrepancy, but the extra 1.25 oz is notable on such a light quilt. Hopefully it's all extra down, since I noted more than the advertised 1.5" (3.8 cm) loft.

PRODUCT DESCRIPTION:

The Stealth is built just like the No Sniveler but without baffles. It measures 78 x 48 x 2 (198 cm x 122 cm x 4 cm) and is made from 1.1 oz ripstop nylon with Durable Water Repellent (DWR) treatment. The fill is 800+ fp goose down. Unlike most of JRB's emerald green products, both layers of the Stealth are black.

The sew-down chambers run perpendicular to the users body, allowing the user to shift the down to the edges or to the center of the quilt as desired to adjust for warmth. I measured the chambers every 7 inches (19 cm).

At the top and bottom of the quilt, a grosgrain drawstring with small cordlocks allows the ends to be tightened to create a footbox or to customize the fit to the hammock. Additionally, an 18" (45 cm) strip of no-snag hook and loop material (omni-tape) on each side allows each quilt to be folded over and attached to itself to extend the footbox up to the knees. Small cords are sewn at the top of each omni-tape strip that serve two purposes; they prevent the velcro from coming undone during the night, and they can be tied behind the wearer to snug the quilt to the body when used as a poncho.

The Stealth has a 14" (36 cm) slit right in the center, closed with omni-tape, to use as a head-hole for wearing as a poncho. This hole is also useful for venting when it gets too hot as a quilt.

For use as an underquilt, each corner has a 1/2 inch (1.3 cm) grosgrain loop to attach the suspension system (not included). It also has grosgrain loops at 25" on one side and 55" on the other side to match the Hennessy Hammock (HH) side tie-outs at the user's right knee and left shoulder. It does not have a slit to match the HH opening so the user simply pushes the Stealth aside to enter the hammock, then repositions it under the hammock after entry.

Discuss this review HERE.

25 Sep 08 - Initial Details
Detail of the corner of the Stealth, showing the new grosgrain rather than the 550 cord that's on my 3-Season Set. Also shows the corner tabs to use it as an underquilt, and the 18" omni-tape used to create the footbox when used as a top quilt. I only plan on using the Stealth as a top quilt.
Footbox is created by mating the omni-tape on both sides and cinching the grosgrain. I usually daisy-chain the drawstring on the No Sniveler to keep it from coming undone during the night. The Stealth should work the same.
The cord at the top of the omni-tape is a nice addition. Here it's pictured holding the footbox together so the velcro doesn't pop open during the night. The footbox is to the left and the quilt opens to the right. That's the 4L Walmart Drybag inside just to show the contrast.

I'll also use the cord to tie the Stealth around my waist when used as a poncho.

Here's the Stealth in a JRB compression sack next to a 1L AquaFina bottle. It's about the size of a large cantaloupe (8" x 6" x 6") with a good bit of compression. I could probably go a bit smaller but I don't like stuffing my down that tight.
Here's the Stealth stuffed into the 2L Walmart Drybag next to a 1L AquaFina bottle. This is stuffed more than I'd like it, and the bag didn't quite close, but it shows how small the Stealth can pack down.
If I don't use the JRB compression sack, I'd be more likely to use the 4L Walmart Drybag size. Still pretty small but I don't have to compress it.

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